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I Was There the Night He Died

I Was There the Night He Died

Ray Robertson

"So,” she says. “Who died tonight?”   Sam Samson, meet Samantha. Sam’s a novelist: his dad has Alzheimer’s, his mother died of stroke, his wife was killed seventeen months ago in a car crash. Samantha, eighteen, is a cutter. She lives across the street from Sam’s parents’ house. Marijuana and loneliness spark an unlikely friendship, which Sam finds hard to navigate, especially as his dad’s…

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Career Limiting Moves

Career Limiting Moves

Zachariah Wells

  By turns celebratory and sceptical, Career Limiting Moves is a selection of essays and reviews drawn from a decade of immersion in Canadian poetry. Inhabiting a milieu in which unfriendly remarks are typically spoken sotto voce, if at all, Wells has consistently said what he thinks aloud. The pieces in this collection comprise revisionist assessments of big names in Canadian Poetry (Margaret Atwood, Lorna Crozier); satirical ripostes…

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Granma Nineteen and the Soviet's Secret

Granma Nineteen and the Soviet's Secret

Ondjaki

By the beaches of Luanda, the Russians are building a grand mausoleum to honour the remains of the Comrade President. Granmas are whispering: houses, they say, will be dexploded, and everyone will have to leave. Can the children of Luanda steal the Russians' dynamite, decipher Comrade Gudafterov's letter, and save their homes? With the help of his friends Charlita and Pi (whom everyone calls 3. 14), as well as assistance from Dr. Rafael KnockKnock,…

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All Saints

All Saints

K. D. Miller

Shortlisted for the 2014 Rogers Writers' Trust Fiction Prize All Saints Anglican is one of the loneliest places on earth. It's ugly, it's small, it's overshadowed by condos. The parishioners aren't exactly close. And yet there they are, every week: the rector with the suicidal wife, the neurotic spinsters, the blue-rinses, the seekers and the newlyweds and the cradle Anglicans, all of them yearning for both connection and privacy at once. Effortlessly…

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Novelists

Novelists

C.P. Boyko

Novelists: the soul of an age, certainly. Brilliant? Perhaps. Yet aren't they also doddering, petulant, pedantic, knock-kneed, skittish, and thunderingly insecure—resentful, awkward, annoying—demanding, deluded, and vexingly indifferent to reality? New from short fiction devotée C. P. Boyko, Novelists is a comedy of manners (and manuscripts), rivalling Vanity Fair for its satirical wit. though not, mercifully, for its length.

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Paradise and Elsewhere

Paradise and Elsewhere

Kathy Page

The rubble of an ancient civilization. A village in a valley from which no one comes or goes. A forest of mother-trees, whispering to each other through their roots; a lakeside lighthouse where a girl slips into human skin as lightly as an otter into water; a desert settlement where there was no conflict, before she came; or the town of Wantwick, ruled by a soothsayer, where tourists lose everything they have. These are the places where things begin.

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Glad and Sorry Seasons

Glad and Sorry Seasons

Catherine Chandler

The second full-length collection from sonneteer and formalist poet Catherine Chandler, Glad and Sorry Seasons brings together new suites of poems—on grief, recovery, the deadly sins, and the virtues of faith, hope, and love—to meditate on those polarities of light and dark, joy and sorrow, that illuminate and cloud our lives by turn. With subjects ranging from Alzheimer’s to Edward Hopper’s Automat, in handsomely crafted…

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