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Aesthetic Underground, An

Aesthetic Underground, An

John Metcalf

The Argus-eyed editor; the magisterial prose stylist; the waggish, inflammatory cultural critic; the mentor and iconoclast. John Metcalf is a Canadian legend, whose memoir maps the literary underground he labored so tirelessly to establish.    .

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Backspring

Backspring

Judith McCormack

Eduardo, an architect from Lisbon, has come to Montreal to be with his wife Geneviève. Geneviève researches fungi and likes to catalogue her orgasms. But when Eduardo is caught in an explosion and rumors of arson begin to circulate, both his marriage and his fledgling architecture firm verge on collapse. Gorgeous, colourful, and richly described, Backspring is a sensual taxonomy of desire.   Coming Spring 2015.

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Heroes

Heroes

Ray Robertson

Peter Bayle—heavy drinker, philosopher, scholar, anemic lover—is in Kansas, writing a feature on middle America's newfound love for hockey. There he meets a morphine-injecting reverend, a reviled reporter, and a drug salesman; obsessed by his self-destructive new friends, Bayle abandons the project and returns home to confront a future and a girlfriend he may no longer want.  .

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Lord Nelson Tavern

Lord Nelson Tavern

Ray Smith

Lord Nelson Tavern presents seven dizzying and carnivalesque sequences that sketch the lives of Ti-Paulo (painter), Paleologue (poet), and friends. Recalling the interlocking narratives of Harry Mathews or Georges Perec, this is an exceptional early work from Smith's experimental period.   Coming Spring 2015.

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My Shoes Are Killing Me

My Shoes Are Killing Me

Robyn Sarah

In My Shoes are Killing Me, poet Robyn Sarah reflects on the passing of time, the fleetingness of dreams, and the bittersweet pleasure of thinking on the “hazardous. treasurehouse” that is the past.  Natural, musical, meditative, warm, and unexpectedly funny, this is a restorative and moving collection from one of Canada’s most well-regarded poets.   Coming Spring 2015.

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Confidence

Confidence

Russell Smith

  In Russell Smith’s darkly brilliant new collection of short stories Confidence, the reader will be introduced to ecstasy-taking PhD students; financial traders desperate for husbands; owners of failing sex stores; violent and unremovable tenants; aggressive raccoons; seedy massage parlours; experimental filmmakers who record every second of their day; wives who blog insults directed at their husbands. There are cheating husbands. …

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Sum

Sum

Zachariah Wells

Nimbly slipping between personae, masks, and moods, the prosody-driven poems of Sum weigh the volatility and mutability of the self against the forces of habit, instinct and urge. With homages to Hopkins, Graves, Wisława Szymborska, Paul Muldoon, and more, and in allusion-dappled, playfully sprung stanzas, this third book from poet and critic Zachariah Wells both wears its influences openly and spins a sound texture all its own, in a collection far greater than its parts.

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History of Forgetting, A

History of Forgetting, A

Caroline Adderson

Malcolm firth is an aging hairdresser whose partner, Denis, in the late stages of Alzheimer’s, has become inexplicably and unexpectedly anti-Semitic. Alison, his young suburban protégée, has never heard of the Holocaust. When Alison notices a tattoo on the arm of one of her older clients, and then one of her gay friends is brutally murdered by a group of skinheads, she is soon propelled on a harrowing journey into a world of hate and confusion.

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Lunar Attractions

Lunar Attractions

Clark Blaise

First published in 1979, Clark Blaise's Lunar Attractions is the story of a whimsical young boy from the Florida backwoods, whose introduction to sexuality - and eventual involvement in a murder investigation, following the death of a teenage cross-dresser and prostitute - has shocked readers for decades. A turbulent sexual odyssey that roils beneath the slick surface of 1950s America.    .

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Arms: The Culture and Credo of the Gun

Arms: The Culture and Credo of the Gun

A. J. Somerset

In Arms: The Culture and Credo of the Gun, novelist, sports shooter and former army reservist A. J. Somerset offers up one of the first looks at the gun as the pre-eminent cultural symbol of power in North America and asks how it got that way. Touring through the various cultural battlefields of 19th- and 20th-century Canada and the United States, including film, literature, music, video games, and history, Somerset charts how the gun went from…

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