David Bergen Launching Here the Dark at McNally Robinson

Poetry Pile On: A Celebration of Best Canadian Poetry 2019 and What the Poets Are Doing

You can find the Facebook event here.

Writers on the River Featuring Amanda Jernigan and Rob Taylor

 

You can find the Facebook event here.

Best Canadian Poetry 2019 at Saint Mary’s University Reading Series

Join us at St. Mary’s University Art Gallery as we celebrate some of the best and brightest contemporary Canadian poets, all featured within Best Canadian Poetry 2019!
Featuring: Sue Goyette, Amanda Jernigan, Annick MacAskill, and Rob Taylor
ABOUT BEST CANADIAN POETRY 2019
Guest editor Rob Taylor, author of the widely acclaimed collection The News, brings a passionate ear for rhythm, an eye for narrative compression, an appetite for vital subject matter, and an affinity for warmth and wit to his selections for Best Canadian Poetry 2019. The fifty ruggedly independent poems gathered here tackle themes of emergence, defiance, ferocious anger, gratitude, and survival. They are alive with acoustic energy, precise in their language, and moving in their use of the personal to explore fraught political realities. They emit a cloud of invisible energy, a charge.
You can find the Facebook event here.

Maya Ombasic Reads from Mostarghia at Wilfrid Laurier

Join us at Wilfrid Laurier to hear Maya Ombasic read from her Prix de la Littérature de l’Exil winning memoir, Mostarghia!

ABOUT MOSTARGHIA

In the south of Bosnia and Herzegovina lies Mostar, a medieval town on the banks of the emerald Neretva, which flows from the “valley of sugared trees” through sunny hills to reach the Adriatic Sea. This idyllic locale is where Maya Ombasic’s life begins, but when civil war breaks out in Yugoslavia and the bombs begin to fall. Her family is exiled to Switzerland, and after a failed attempt to return, they leave again for Canada. While Maya adapts to their uprootings, her father never recovers from the trauma, refusing even to learn the language of his new country. Mostarghia, a portmanteau of “Mostar” and “nostalgia,” centers around Ombasic’s often explosive relationship with her father, who was both influence and psychological burden: he inspired her interest, and eventual career, in philosophy, and she was his translator, his support, his obsession. Along with this portrait of a larger-than-life man described by turns as passionate, endearing, maddening, and suffocating, Ombasic deftly constructs a moving personal account of what it means to be a refugee and how a generation learns to thrive despite its parents’ struggles.

ABOUT MAYA OMBASIC

Born in Mostar (formerly Yugoslavia) in 1979, Maya Ombasic immigrated to Switzerland during the Balkan War and later settled in Quebec. She is currently a literary columnist for Le Devoir and teaches philosophy at Cégep de Saint-Laurent in Montréal.

Maya Ombasic at The Bookshelf

Join us at The Bookshelf to hear Maya Ombasic read from her Prix de la Littérature de l’Exil winning memoir, Mostarghia!

ABOUT MOSTARGHIA

In the south of Bosnia and Herzegovina lies Mostar, a medieval town on the banks of the emerald Neretva, which flows from the “valley of sugared trees” through sunny hills to reach the Adriatic Sea. This idyllic locale is where Maya Ombasic’s life begins, but when civil war breaks out in Yugoslavia and the bombs begin to fall. Her family is exiled to Switzerland, and after a failed attempt to return, they leave again for Canada. While Maya adapts to their uprootings, her father never recovers from the trauma, refusing even to learn the language of his new country. Mostarghia, a portmanteau of “Mostar” and “nostalgia,” centers around Ombasic’s often explosive relationship with her father, who was both influence and psychological burden: he inspired her interest, and eventual career, in philosophy, and she was his translator, his support, his obsession. Along with this portrait of a larger-than-life man described by turns as passionate, endearing, maddening, and suffocating, Ombasic deftly constructs a moving personal account of what it means to be a refugee and how a generation learns to thrive despite its parents’ struggles.

ABOUT MAYA OMBASIC

Born in Mostar (formerly Yugoslavia) in 1979, Maya Ombasic immigrated to Switzerland during the Balkan War and later settled in Quebec. She is currently a literary columnist for Le Devoir and teaches philosophy at Cégep de Saint-Laurent in Montréal.

Maya Ombasic Reads from Mostarghia at the University of Guelph

Book Launch: Ray Robertson’s “How to Die” at Novel Idea

Join us at Novel Idea Bookstore as we launch the newest book from Ray Robertson and the spiritual sequel to the Hilary Weston Writers’ Trust Prize for Nonfiction and Charles Taylor Prize for Literary Non-Fiction nominated “Why Not? Fifteen Reasons to Live”: HOW TO DIE: A BOOK ABOUT BEING ALIVE!

About HOW TO DIE:
A radical revaluation of how contemporary society perceives death—and a literary tourist’s argument for how it can make us happy.

“He who would teach men to die would teach them to live,” writes Montaigne in Essais, and in HOW TO DIE, Ray Robertson takes up the challenge, arguing that the active and intentional consideration of death is essential to our ability to value life. An absorbing excursion through some of Western literature’s most compelling works on the subject of death and a self-help book for people who hate self-help, HOW TO DIE is an anecdote-driven argument for cultivating a better understanding of death in the belief that, if we do, we’ll know more about what it means to live meaningfully

About Ray Robertson:
Ray Robertson is the author of the novels Home Movies, Heroes, Moody Food, Gently Down the Stream, What Happened Later, David, I Was There The Night He Died, and 1979 as well as the non-fiction collections Lives of the Poets (with Guitars), Mental Hygiene: Essays on Writers and Writing and Why Not? Fifteen Reasons to Live, which was short-listed for the Hilary Weston Prize for non-fiction and long-listed for the Charles Taylor Prize for non-fiction. Born and raised in Southwestern Ontario, he lives in Toronto.

You can find the Facebook event here.

Book Launch: Ray Robertson’s How to Die

Join us at Biblioasis Bookshop as we launch the newest book from Ray Robertson and the spiritual sequel to the Hilary Weston Writers’ Trust Prize for Nonfiction and Charles Taylor Prize for Literary Non-Fiction nominated “Why Not? Fifteen Reasons to Live”: HOW TO DIE: A BOOK ABOUT BEING ALIVE!

About HOW TO DIE:
A radical revaluation of how contemporary society perceives death—and a literary tourist’s argument for how it can make us happy.

“He who would teach men to die would teach them to live,” writes Montaigne in Essais, and in HOW TO DIE, Ray Robertson takes up the challenge, arguing that the active and intentional consideration of death is essential to our ability to value life. An absorbing excursion through some of Western literature’s most compelling works on the subject of death and a self-help book for people who hate self-help, HOW TO DIE is an anecdote-driven argument for cultivating a better understanding of death in the belief that, if we do, we’ll know more about what it means to live meaningfully

About Ray Robertson:
Ray Robertson is the author of the novels Home Movies, Heroes, Moody Food, Gently Down the Stream, What Happened Later, David, I Was There The Night He Died, and 1979 as well as the non-fiction collections Lives of the Poets (with Guitars), Mental Hygiene: Essays on Writers and Writing and Why Not? Fifteen Reasons to Live, which was short-listed for the Hilary Weston Prize for non-fiction and long-listed for the Charles Taylor Prize for non-fiction. Born and raised in Southwestern Ontario, he lives in Toronto.

You can find the Facebook event here.

Ray Robertson’s How to Die Hamilton Book Launch

We are really excited to be hosting the Hamilton launch of Ray Robertson’s new book How to Die: A Book About Being Alive on Friday, February 21st. Doors open at 7 with Ray reading at 7:30p. Hope you can make it out! It is going to be a fantastic night!

You can find the Facebook event here.