Householders and Chemical Valley: Virtual Double Launch

Join us for a special virtual launch for two short story collections! We’ll be celebrating David Huebert’s Chemical Valley and Kate Cayley’s Householders. 

Tune in live on Thursday, September 29 at 7PM EDT / 8PM ADT. Kate Cayley and David Huebert will be joined in conversation by author Sofi Papamarko. Co-hosted by Another Story Bookshop. There will be readings, discussions, an audience Q&A, and a book giveaway. You could win a copy of one of the new books!
We’ll be streaming live on Facebook & on YouTube. Video link will be shared closer to the event date. RSVP to stay up to date!

ABOUT HOUSEHOLDERS
Linked short stories about families, nascent queers, and self-deluded utopians explore the moral ordinary strangeness in their characters’ overlapping lives.
A woman impersonates a nun online, with unexpected consequences. In a rapidly changing neighborhood, tensions escalate around two events planned for the same day. The barista girlfriend of a tech billionaire survives a zombie apocalypse only to face spending her life with the paranoid super-rich. From a university campus to an underground bunker, a commune in the woods to Toronto and back again, the linked stories in Householders move effortlessly between the commonplace and the fantastic. In deft and exacting narratives about difficult children and thorny friendships, hopeful revolutionaries and self-deluded utopians, nascent queers, sincere frauds, and families of all kinds, Kate Cayley mines the moral hazards inherent in the ways we try to save each other and ourselves.

ABOUT KATE CAYLEY
Kate Cayley has previously written a short story collection, two poetry collections, and a number of plays, both traditional and experimental, which have been produced in Canada and the US. She is a frequent writing collaborator with immersive company Zuppa Theatre. She has won the Trillium Book Award and an O. Henry Prize and been a finalist for the Governor General’s Award. She lives in Toronto with her wife and their three children.

ABOUT CHEMICAL VALLEY
Oil-soaked and swamp-born, the bruised optimism of Huebert’s stories offer sincere appreciation of the beauty of our wilted, wheezing world.
From city-dwelling preppers to long term care nurses, dishwashers to professional hockey enforcers to refinery workers, Chemical Valley’s caring and carefully-wrought stories cultivate rich human emotional worlds in all the dankness of our bio-chemical animacy. Full-hearted, laced throughout with bruised optimism and a sincere appreciation of the profound beauty of our wilted, wheezing world, Chemical Valley does not shy away from urgent modern questions—the distribution of toxicity, environmental racism, the future of technology, the climate, and the human body—but it grounds these anxieties in vivid and often humorous intricacies of its characters’ lives. These are stories about big questions, but they are not scared of sentiment. Swamp-wrought, they run wild with vital energy, tilt and teeter into crazed and delirious loves.

ABOUT DAVID HUEBERT
David Huebert’s writing has won the CBC Short Story Prize, The Walrus Poetry Prize, and was a finalist for the 2020 Journey Prize. David’s fiction debut, Peninsula Sinking, won a Dartmouth Book Award, was shortlisted for the Alistair MacLeod Short Fiction Prize, and was runner-up for the Danuta Gleed Literary Award. David’s work has been published in magazines such as The Walrus, Maisonneuve, enRoute, and Canadian Notes & Queries, and anthologized in Best Canadian Stories and The Journey Prize Stories. David teaches at The University of King’s College in K’jipuktuk/Halifax, where he lives and writes.

 

Order your copy of Householders here!

Order your copy of Chemical Valley here!

Things Are Against Us Virtual Launch

You’re invited to join us for the virtual launch of Lucy Ellmann’s debut essay collection, Things Are Against Us!

Tune in live on Sunday, September 26 at 2PM EDT / 7PM BST. Lucy Ellmann will be joined in conversation by Todd McEwen and Diana Hope. The event will be hosted by Josh Cook. Biblioasis is partnering with King’s Co-op Bookstore (Halifax, NS), Porter Square Books (Cambridge, MA), and Mac’s Backs (Cleveland Heights, OH) for the event. There will be a reading, discussions, an audience Q&A, and a book giveaway. You could win a copy of THINGS ARE AGAINST US!
We’ll be streaming live on Facebook and YouTube. RSVP to stay up to date!

 

ABOUT THINGS ARE AGAINST US

“It’s somehow hard not to be optimistic in the hands of a writer so angry and intelligent.”—Patrick Ness, Guardian

Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold. As Yeats pointed out, things have a lot to answer for. These satirical essays jauntily tackle the obstinacy, incorrigibility, and recalcitrance of things, Laura Ingalls Wilder’s unimpressive descriptions of the construction of bobsleds and door latches, and the way we try to stand on our own two feet, put our best foot forward, remain footloose and fancy-free, and inevitably put our foot in it. They also cover the first suggestion the internet offers when you look up the word ‘women’ (spoiler: it’s shoes) and other annoyances (some fatal) of male supremacy, the nobility of buttons, and what the rejection of tourists by Jordanian donkeys should mean for global travel (stop!). Ingrid Bergman and Jane Austen come into it somewhere (Helen Gurley Brown was forcibly removed).

Early versions of some of these essays have appeared in international outlets of record, but others are brand-new and ready for your delectation.

ABOUT LUCY ELLMANN

Here’s the thing: Lucy Ellmann is extremely shy. She’s so awkward and self-conscious that meeting strangers, or almost anyone, exhausts her. She’s lousy at remembering names. She cannot add or subtract. She hates having appointments in her diary and prefers to wear the same outfit every day. She’s a helpless iconoclast much prone to anger. She’s also distrustful, lazy, and easily hurt. She is not a team player. She prefers interrupting people to organising them, and cries if she doesn’t get her way. She fears she’s neglected everybody she knows, and vice versa—not to mention people she doesn’t know. She can’t stand protocol, committees, business hours, ceremonial occasions, and filling out forms. And she never wants to be carried through a crowd on a palanquin. Otherwise, the world’s her oyster! She has written seven novels, including Sweet Desserts (Guardian Fiction Prize) and Ducks, Newburyport (Goldsmiths Prize, James Tait Black Memorial Prize), and an illustrated book for adults, called Tom the Obscure. This is her first essay collection.

 

Order your copy of Things Are Against Us from Biblioasis here!

Rob Taylor at Word Vancouver

Rob Taylor, author of Strangers, will be joined by fellow poet Matsuki Masutani for a reading and discussion of their works at Word Vancouver. The event will be hosted by Daniela Elza, and will take place on Thursday, September 16 at 7PM PDT.

Tickets are free and available here!

Get your copy of Strangers from Biblioasis here!

You Will Love at Kingston WritersFest

Content warning – this event discusses subject matter that some audience members might find distressing. Discretion is advised.

Brave New Words: A Dark Debut

Kevin Lambert is not even 30 years old, and he is already making a big name for himself in Quebec, and building a reputation for his controversial subjects and powerful, poetic, inventive prose. Here, with the English translation of his first novel, You Will Love What You Have Killed, Kevin will talk about vengeful ghosts, childhood wounds, and one of the most surreal small town depictions in recent literary memory. A strange, dark and rewarding tale for those not averse to a touch of the bizarre. The reading and talk will take place on Saturday, September 25 at 8:30PM EDT.

Register for the event for free here!

 

ABOUT YOU WILL LOVE WHAT YOU HAVE KILLED

Faldistoire’s grandfather thinks he’s a ghost. Sylvie’s mother reads tarot and summons stormclouds to mete her witch’s justice. Behind his Dad of the Year demeanour, Sébastien’s father hides dark designs. It’s Croustine’s grandfather who makes the boy a pair of slippers from the dead family dog, but it’s his father, the cannily-named Kevin Lambert, who always seems to be nearby when tragedy strikes, and in the cemetery, under the baleful eyes of toads, small graves are dug one after the other: Chicoutimi, Quebec, is a dangerous place for children. But these young victims of rape, arbitrary violence, and senseless murder keep coming back from the dead. They return to school, explore their sexualities, keep tabs on grown-up sins—and plot their apocalyptic retribution.

Surreal and darkly comic, this debut novel by Kevin Lambert, one of the most celebrated and controversial writers to come out of Quebec in recent memory, takes the adult world to task—and then takes revenge.

ABOUT KEVIN LAMBERT

Born in 1992, Kevin Lambert grew up in Chicoutimi, Quebec. He earned a master’s degree in creative writing at the Université de Montréal. His first novel, You Will Love What You Have Killed, was widely acclaimed, won a prize for the best novel from the Saguenay region, and was a finalist for Quebec’s Booksellers’ Prize. His second novel, Querelle de Roberval, has been acclaimed in both Quebec, where it was nominated for four literary prizes, and France, where it was a finalist for the prestigious Prix Médicis and the literary prize of the Paris newspaper Le Monde, and won the Marquis de Sade Prize. Lambert lives in Montreal.

 

Order your copy from Biblioasis here!

Catherine Fogarty: Writers Studio Seminar

The inspiration for writing about historical events can come from anywhere. For Catherine Fogarty, it was a chance encounter with a “This Day in History” column in a national newspaper that led her to write Murder on the Inside: The True Story of the Deadly Riot at Kingston Penitentiary. But a spark alone won’t get you to the finish line. In this seminar, Catherine will discuss her strategies and advice for shaping a story, collecting the information, doing your homework, and getting it on the page. Join Catherine on Friday, September 24 at 10:00AM EDT.

This event will cost $15 CAD and has limited enrollment, so be sure to register ASAP here!

 

ABOUT MURDER ON THE INSIDE

“You have taken our civil rights—we want our human rights.”

On April 14, 1971, a handful of prisoners attacked the guards at Kingston Penitentiary and seized control, making headlines around the world. For four intense days, the prisoners held the guards hostage while their leaders negotiated with a citizens’ committee of journalists and lawyers, drawing attention to the dehumanizing realities of their incarceration, including overcrowding, harsh punishment and extreme isolation. But when another group of convicts turned their pent-up rage towards some of the weakest prisoners, tensions inside the old stone walls erupted, with tragic consequences. As heavily armed soldiers prepared to regain control of the prison through a full military assault, the inmates were finally forced to surrender.

Murder on the Inside tells the harrowing story of a prison in crisis against the backdrop of a pivotal moment in the history of human rights. Occurring just months before the uprising at Attica Prison, the Kingston riot has remained largely undocumented, and few have known the details—yet the tense drama chronicled here is more relevant today than ever. A gripping account of the standoff and the efforts for justice and reform it inspired, Murder on the Inside is essential reading for our times.

ABOUT CATHERINE FOGARTY

Catherine Fogarty is a storyteller. She is the founder and president of Big Coat Media, with offices in Toronto, Los Angeles, Vancouver, and North Carolina. An accomplished television producer, writer and director, Catherine has produced award-winning lifestyle, reality and documentary series for both Canadian and American networks. Catherine is the executive producer of the Gemini nominated series Love It or List It. In addition to that franchise, Catherine has produced several other lifestyle and documentary series including Animal Magnetism (W Network), My Parents’ House (HGTV), and Paranormal Home Inspectors (Investigative Discovery Canada). Catherine also produced and directed I Don’t Have Time for This, an intimate documentary about young women with breast cancer. Originally trained as a social worker, Catherine studied deviance and criminology. She worked with numerous at-risk populations including street youth, people with AIDS, abused women, and social services.

 

Order your copy from Biblioasis here!

Muder on the Inside at Kingston WritersFest

Before Attica: The Kingston Pen’s Forgotten Riot

On April 14, 1971, one of the most violent and devastating prison riots in Canadian history erupted behind the walls of Kingston Pen. Yet fifty years later, few know the real story, and few are willing to talk about it. In Murder on the Inside: The True Story of the Deadly Riot at Kingston Penitentiary, author Catherine Fogarty negotiates the stone walls and red tape of the prison system to explore the motives behind the violence, including a call for basic human rights that still plagues the system today. This event will take place at Kingston Writersfest on Thursday, September 23 at 11:00AM EDT.

You can register for free here!

ABOUT MURDER ON THE INSIDE

“You have taken our civil rights—we want our human rights.”

On April 14, 1971, a handful of prisoners attacked the guards at Kingston Penitentiary and seized control, making headlines around the world. For four intense days, the prisoners held the guards hostage while their leaders negotiated with a citizens’ committee of journalists and lawyers, drawing attention to the dehumanizing realities of their incarceration, including overcrowding, harsh punishment and extreme isolation. But when another group of convicts turned their pent-up rage towards some of the weakest prisoners, tensions inside the old stone walls erupted, with tragic consequences. As heavily armed soldiers prepared to regain control of the prison through a full military assault, the inmates were finally forced to surrender.

Murder on the Inside tells the harrowing story of a prison in crisis against the backdrop of a pivotal moment in the history of human rights. Occurring just months before the uprising at Attica Prison, the Kingston riot has remained largely undocumented, and few have known the details—yet the tense drama chronicled here is more relevant today than ever. A gripping account of the standoff and the efforts for justice and reform it inspired, Murder on the Inside is essential reading for our times.

ABOUT CATHERINE FOGARTY

Catherine Fogarty is a storyteller. She is the founder and president of Big Coat Media, with offices in Toronto, Los Angeles, Vancouver, and North Carolina. An accomplished television producer, writer and director, Catherine has produced award-winning lifestyle, reality and documentary series for both Canadian and American networks. Catherine is the executive producer of the Gemini nominated series Love It or List It. In addition to that franchise, Catherine has produced several other lifestyle and documentary series including Animal Magnetism (W Network), My Parents’ House (HGTV), and Paranormal Home Inspectors (Investigative Discovery Canada). Catherine also produced and directed I Don’t Have Time for This, an intimate documentary about young women with breast cancer. Originally trained as a social worker, Catherine studied deviance and criminology. She worked with numerous at-risk populations including street youth, people with AIDS, abused women, and social services.

 

Order your copy from Biblioasis here!

The Singing Forest at Kingston WritersFest

The Voices of Ghosts

A long-buried bone found in the forest. A generation of women united by unspoken trauma. Mass graves unearthed. Voices united in protest. A secret that can no longer be hushed, and the slow, quixotic quest to bring those responsible to justice. In this event, Judith McCormack (The Singing Forest) is joined by author Kim Echlin (Speak, Silence) for a reading and conversation with Hal Wake about different wars from different eras, both with devastating human tolls for the victims and the survivors who bear the scars of generational trauma. The event will take place on Friday, September 24 at 2:00PM EDT.

Register in advance here!

 

ABOUT THE SINGING FOREST

In attempting to bring a suspected war criminal to justice, a lawyer wrestles with power, accountability, and her Jewish identity.

In a quiet forest in Belarus, two boys make a gruesome find that reveals a long-kept secret: the mass grave where Stalin’s police buried thousands of murder victims in the 1930s. The results of the subsequent investigation—30,000 dead—has far-reaching effects, and across the Atlantic in Toronto, young lawyer Leah Jarvis finds herself tasked with an impossible case: the trial of elderly Stefan Drozd, a former member of Stalin’s forces, who fled his crimes in Kurapaty for a new identity in Canada. Though Leah is convinced of Drozd’s guilt, she needs hard facts. Determined to bring him to justice, she travels to Belarus in search of witnesses—and finds herself piecing together another set of evidence: her mother’s death, her father’s absence, the shadows of her Jewish heritage. Lyrical and wrenching by turns, The Singing Forest is a profound investigation of memory, truth, and the stories that tell us who we are.

ABOUT JUDITH MCCORMACK

Judith McCormack was born in Evanston, and grew up in Toronto, with several years in Montreal and Vancouver. She is Jewish through her mother, and her maternal grandparents came from Belarus and Lithuania, with her father contributing his Scots-Irish heritage. Her writing has been shortlisted for the Writers’ Trust Fiction Prize, the Commonwealth Writers’ Fiction Prize, the Journey Prize and the Amazon First Novel Award, and her short stories have appeared in the Harvard ReviewDescantThe FiddleheadComing Attractions and Best Canadian Stories. She also has several law degrees, which first introduced her to story-telling, and is a recipient of the Law Society Medal and The Guthrie Award for access to justice.

 

Preorder your copy from Biblioasis here!

Rinaldo Walcott at Word On The Street

Celebrate the finalists for the 2021 Toronto Book Awards, and honour books of literary merit that are inspired by the city! Presented by the City of Toronto, the winner will be announced this fall. On Property will be among the books featured on Wednesday, Sept 22 from 8-9PM EDT. Rinaldo Walcott will be joined by Catherine Graham, Catherine Hernandez, Justin Ling, Kim Echlin, and Faye Guenther.

You can RSVP now for this event here!

 

ABOUT ON PROPERTY

From plantation rebellion to prison labour’s super-exploitation, Walcott examines the relationship between policing and property.

That a man can lose his life for passing a fake $20 bill when we know our economies are flush with fake money says something damning about the way we’ve organized society. Yet the intensity of the calls to abolish the police after George Floyd’s death surprised almost everyone. What, exactly, does abolition mean? How did we get here? And what does property have to do with it? In On Property, Rinaldo Walcott explores the long shadow cast by slavery’s afterlife and shows how present-day abolitionists continue the work of their forebears in service of an imaginative, creative philosophy that ensures freedom and equality for all. Thoughtful, wide-ranging, compassionate, and profound, On Property makes an urgent plea for a new ethics of care.

ABOUT RINALDO WALCOTT

Rinaldo Walcott is a Professor in the Women and Gender Studies Institute at the University of Toronto. His research is in the area of Black Diaspora Cultural Studies, gender and sexuality.

 

Get your copy from Biblioasis here!

On the Origin Virtual Launch

You’re invited to the virtual launch of the next compelling addition to our Field Notes series, Elaine Dewar’s On the Origin of the Deadliest Pandemic in 100 Years! We’ll be streaming live on Wednesday, Sept. 15 at 6PM EDT. Elaine Dewar will be be joined in conversation by Wayne Grady, Canadian writer, editor, and translator. Stick around until the end, and you could win a copy of On the Origin of the Deadliest Pandemic in 100 Years!

You can watch on Facebook Live or on YouTube! Stay tuned for more details.

 

ABOUT ON THE ORIGIN OF THE DEADLIEST PANDEMIC IN 100 YEARS

In this compelling whodunnit, Elaine Dewar reads the science, follows the money, and connects the geopolitical interests to the spin.

When the first TV newscast described a SARS-like flu affecting a distant Chinese metropolis, investigative journalist Elaine Dewar started asking questions: Was SARS-CoV-2 something that came from nature, as leading scientists insisted, or did it come from a lab, and what role might controversial experiments have played in its development? Why was Wuhan the pandemic’s ground zero—and why, on the other side of the Atlantic, had two researchers been marched out of a lab in Winnipeg by the RCMP? Why were governments so slow to respond to the emerging pandemic, and why, now, is the government of China refusing to cooperate with the World Health Organization? And who, or what, is DRASTIC?

Locked down in Toronto with the world at a standstill, Dewar pored over newspapers and magazines, preprints and peer-reviewed journals, email chains and blacked-out responses to access to information requests; she conducted Zoom interviews and called telephone numbers until someone answered as she hunted down the truth of the virus’s origin. In this compelling whodunnit, she reads the science, follows the money, connects the geopolitical interests to the spin—and shows how leading science journals got it wrong, leaving it to interested citizens and junior scientists to pull out the truth.

ABOUT ELAINE DEWAR

Elaine Dewar—author, journalist, television story editor—has been honoured by nine National Magazine awards, including the prestigious President’s Medal, and the White Award. Her first book, Cloak of Green, delved into the dark side of environmental politics and became an underground classic. Bones: Discovering the First Americans, an investigation of the science and politics regarding the peopling of the Americas, was a national bestseller and earned a special commendation from the Canadian Archaeological Association. The Second Tree: of Clones, Chimeras, and Quests for Immortality, won Canada’s premier literary non-fiction prize from the Writers’ Trust. Called “Canada’s Rachel Carson,” Dewar aspires to be a happy warrior for the public good.

 

Order your copy from Biblioasis here!

On Decline Virtual Launch

Join us for the virtual launch of our next Field Note, Andrew Potter’s On Decline! We’ll be streaming live on Facebook and on YouTube on Thursday, Sept. 9 at 5:30PM EDT. Andrew Potter will be be joined in conversation by Jonathan Montpetit, journalist with CBC. Stick around until the end, and you could win a copy of On Decline!

 

ABOUT ON DECLINE

What if David Bowie really was holding the fabric of the universe together?

The death of David Bowie in January 2016 was a bad start to a year that got a lot worse: war in Syria, the Zika virus, terrorist attacks in Brussels and Nice, the Brexit vote—and the election of Donald Trump. The end-of-year wraps declared 2016 “the worst … ever.” Four even more troubling years later, the question of our apocalypse had devolved into a tired social media cliché. But when COVID-19 hit, journalist and professor of public policy Andrew Potter started to wonder: what if The End isn’t one big event, but a long series of smaller ones?

In On Decline, Potter surveys the current problems and likely future of Western civilization (spoiler: it’s not great). Economic stagnation and the slowing of scientific innovation. Falling birth rates and environmental degradation. The devastating effects of cultural nostalgia and the havoc wreaked by social media on public discourse. Most acutely, the various failures of Western governments in their responses to the COVID-19 pandemic. If the legacy of the Enlightenment and its virtues—reason, logic, science, evidence—has run its course, how and why has it happened? And where do we go from here?

ABOUT ANDREW POTTER

Andrew Potter is an associate professor (professional) at the Max Bell School of Public Policy. A former journalist, between 2011 and 2016 Andrew Potter was managing editor and then editor in chief of the Ottawa Citizen, and from 2006 to 2011 he was a public affairs columnist for Maclean’s Magazine. He is also a former Director of the McGill Institute for the Study of Canada. Potter is the author of The Authenticity Hoax: How We Get Lost Finding Ourselves, and the co-author, with Joseph Heath, of the best-selling book The Rebel Sell: Why the Culture Can’t be Jammed.

 

Order your copy from Biblioasis here!