Oct
30
Sat
Hamilton Reads Author Talk on Climate Writing with David Huebert
Oct 30 @ 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm
Hamilton Reads Author Talk on Climate Writing with David Huebert

David Huebert, author of Chemical Valley, joins fellow writer Shaena Lambert (Petra Island) in a discussion on climate fiction writing, hosted by Hamilton Reads author Catherine Bush (Blaze Island). This virtual event will take place over Microsoft Teams on Saturday, October 30 at 2PM EDT.

Link available here!

 

ABOUT CHEMICAL VALLEY
Oil-soaked and swamp-born, the bruised optimism of Huebert’s stories offer sincere appreciation of the beauty of our wilted, wheezing world.
From city-dwelling preppers to long term care nurses, dishwashers to professional hockey enforcers to refinery workers, Chemical Valley’s caring and carefully-wrought stories cultivate rich human emotional worlds in all the dankness of our bio-chemical animacy. Full-hearted, laced throughout with bruised optimism and a sincere appreciation of the profound beauty of our wilted, wheezing world, Chemical Valley does not shy away from urgent modern questions—the distribution of toxicity, environmental racism, the future of technology, the climate, and the human body—but it grounds these anxieties in vivid and often humorous intricacies of its characters’ lives. These are stories about big questions, but they are not scared of sentiment. Swamp-wrought, they run wild with vital energy, tilt and teeter into crazed and delirious loves.

ABOUT DAVID HUEBERT
David Huebert’s writing has won the CBC Short Story Prize, The Walrus Poetry Prize, and was a finalist for the 2020 Journey Prize. David’s fiction debut, Peninsula Sinking, won a Dartmouth Book Award, was shortlisted for the Alistair MacLeod Short Fiction Prize, and was runner-up for the Danuta Gleed Literary Award. David’s work has been published in magazines such as The Walrus, Maisonneuve, enRoute, and Canadian Notes & Queries, and anthologized in Best Canadian Stories and The Journey Prize Stories. David teaches at The University of King’s College in K’jipuktuk/Halifax, where he lives and writes.

 

Order your copy of Chemical Valley here!

Nov
3
Wed
The Singing Forest Virtual Launch
Nov 3 @ 7:00 pm – 8:00 pm
The Singing Forest Virtual Launch

You’re invited to the virtual launch of Judith McCormacks’s The Singing Forest! Join us on Wednesday, November 3 at 7PM ET. Judith McCormack will be joined in conversation by criminal lawyer Frank Addario, and author and Judge Maryka Omatsu. We’ll be streaming live on Facebook & on YouTube. Video link will be shared closer to the event, so RSVP to stay up to date!

ABOUT THE SINGING FOREST

In a quiet forest in Belarus, two boys make a gruesome find that reveals a long-kept secret: the mass grave where Stalin’s police buried thousands of murder victims in the 1930s. The results of the subsequent investigation—30,000 dead—has far-reaching effects, and across the Atlantic in Toronto, young lawyer Leah Jarvis finds herself tasked with an impossible case: the trial of elderly Stefan Drozd, a former member of Stalin’s forces, who fled his crimes in Kurapaty for a new identity in Canada. Though Leah is convinced of Drozd’s guilt, she needs hard facts. Determined to bring him to justice, she travels to Belarus in search of witnesses—and finds herself piecing together another set of evidence: her mother’s death, her father’s absence, the shadows of her Jewish heritage. Lyrical and wrenching by turns, The Singing Forest is a profound investigation of memory, truth, and the stories that tell us who we are.

ABOUT JUDITH MCCORMACK

Judith McCormack was born in Evanston, and grew up in Toronto, with several years in Montreal and Vancouver. She is Jewish through her mother, and her maternal grandparents came from Belarus and Lithuania, with her father contributing his Scots-Irish heritage. Her writing has been shortlisted for the Writers’ Trust Fiction Prize, the Commonwealth Writers’ Fiction Prize, the Journey Prize and the Amazon First Novel Award, and her short stories have appeared in the Harvard Review, Descant, The Fiddlehead, Coming Attractions and Best Canadian Stories. She also has several law degrees, which first introduced her to story-telling, and is a recipient of the Law Society Medal and The Guthrie Award for access to justice.

Order from Biblioasis here!

Nov
4
Thu
Foregone at Greenwood StoryFest
Nov 4 @ 7:00 pm – 8:00 pm
Foregone at Greenwood StoryFest

Join this virtual event celebrating 20 years of storytelling! Greenwood StoryFest welcomes esteemed author and finalist for the Pulitzer Prize for fiction: Russell Banks. Zoom from the comfort of your home where you can listen to Russell Banks and a StoryFest committee member in conversation about his latest novel, Foregone (March 16, 2021) along with other career highlights. The event will take place on Thursday, November 4 at 7PM EDT.

Registration open here!

 

ABOUT FOREGONE

In his late seventies and dying of cancer, famed Canadian-American documentary filmmaker Leonard Fife, one of sixty thousand draft evaders who fled to Canada to avoid Vietnam, has agreed to one final interview, determined to bare all his secrets and demythologize his mythologized life. But the story that unspools in front of the camera and an intimate chorus of observers, including Fife’s wife, his nurse, and his acolyte and former star student Malcolm Macleod, is confoundingly unexpected, the dark and affecting account of a man entirely unknown to all.

A searing novel about memory, betrayal, love, and the faint grace note of redemption, Russell Banks’s Foregone is a daring and resonant work about the scope of one man’s mysterious life, revealed through the fragments of his recovered past.

ABOUT RUSSELL BANKS

Russell Banks, twice a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize, is one of America’s most prestigious fiction writers, a past president of the International Parliament of Writers, and a member of the American Academy of Arts and Letters. His work has been translated into twenty languages and has received numerous prizes and awards, including the Common Wealth Award for Literature. He lives in upstate New York and Miami, Florida.

 

Get your copy from Biblioasis here!

Best Canadian Poetry 2021 Virtual Launch
Nov 4 @ 7:30 pm – 8:30 pm
Best Canadian Poetry 2021 Virtual Launch

Join us for the live virtual launch of Best Canadian Poetry 2021, hosted by the Ottawa International Writers Festival! Featuring a conversation between series editor Anita Lahey and guest editor Souvankham Thammavongsa, and live poetry from many of the contributors. Check back soon for the full list of guest poets! The event will take place on Thursday, November 4 at 7:30PM EDT.

“This is a book,” writes guest editor Souvankham Thammavongsa, “about what I saw and read and loved, and want you to see and read and love.” Selected from work published by Canadian poets in magazines and journals in 2020, Best Canadian Poetry 2021 gathers the poems Thammavongsa loved most over a year’s worth of reading, and draws together voices that “got in and out quickly, that said unusual things, that were clear, spare, and plain, that made [her] laugh out loud … the voices that barely ever survive to make it onto the page.” From new work by Canadian icons to thrilling emerging talents, this year’s anthology offers fifty poems for you to fall in love with as well.

RSVP for the event here!

 

ABOUT BEST CANADIAN POETRY 2021

“This is a book,” writes guest editor Souvankham Thammavongsa, “about what I saw and read and loved, and want you to see and read and love.” Selected from work published by Canadian poets in magazines and journals in 2020, Best Canadian Poetry 2021 gathers the poems Thammavongsa loved most over a year’s worth of reading, and draws together voices that “got in and out quickly, that said unusual things, that were clear, spare, and plain, that made [her] laugh out loud … the voices that barely ever survive to make it onto the page.” From new work by Canadian icons to thrilling emerging talents, this year’s anthology offers fifty poems for you to fall in love with as well.

Featuring:

Margaret Atwood • Ken Babstock • Manahil Bandukwala • Courtney Bates-Hardy • Roxanna Bennett • Ronna Bloom • Louise Carson • Kate Cayley  • Kitty Cheung • Dani Couture • Kayla Czaga • Šari Dale • Unnati Desai • Tina Do • Andrew DuBois • Paola Ferrante • Beth Goobie • Nina Philomena Honorat • Liz Howard • Maureen Hynes • George K Ilsley • Eve Joseph • Ian Keteku • Judith Krause • M Travis Lane • Mary Dean Lee • Canisia Lubrin • Randy Lundy • David Ly • Yohani Mendis • Pamela Mosher • Susan Musgrave • Téa Mutonji • Barbara Nickel • Ottavia Paluch • Kirsten Pendreigh • Emily Pohl-Weary • David Romanda • Matthew Rooney • Zoe Imani Sharpe • Sue Sinclair • John Steffler • Sarah Yi-Mei Tsiang • Arielle Twist • David Ezra Wang • Phoebe Wang • Hayden Ward • Elana Wolff • Eugenia Zuroski • Jan Zwicky

ABOUT SOUVANKHAM THAMMAVONGSA

Souvankham Thammavongsa is the author of five books: Small Arguments (2003), winner of the ReLit Prize; Found (2007), now a short film; Light (2013), winner of the Trillium Book Award for Poetry; Cluster (2019); and the short story collection How to Pronounce Knife (2020), winner of the Scotiabank Giller Prize and a New York Times Editors’ Choice. She has been in residence at Yaddo and has presented her work at the Guggenheim Museum in New York.

 

Order your copy from Biblioasis here!

Nov
8
Mon
Elaine Dewar at TPL: On the Origin of the Deadliest Pandemic in 100 Years
Nov 8 @ 7:00 pm – 8:00 pm
Elaine Dewar at TPL: On the Origin of the Deadliest Pandemic in 100 Years

Elaine Dewar joins the Toronto Star’s Saba Eitizaz to discuss On the Origins of the Deadliest Pandemic in 100 Years and the importance of asking tough questions during tough times. The event is part of the Toronto Public Library’s On Civil Society series. This virtual event will take place on Monday, November 8 at 7PM EDT.

Save your spot here!

 

ABOUT ON THE ORIGIN OF THE DEADLIEST PANDEMIC IN 100 YEARS

When the first TV newscast described a SARS-like flu affecting a distant Chinese metropolis, investigative journalist Elaine Dewar started asking questions: Was SARS-CoV-2 something that came from nature, as leading scientists insisted, or did it come from a lab, and what role might controversial experiments have played in its development? Why was Wuhan the pandemic’s ground zero—and why, on the other side of the Atlantic, had two researchers been marched out of a lab in Winnipeg by the RCMP? Why were governments so slow to respond to the emerging pandemic, and why, now, is the government of China refusing to cooperate with the World Health Organization? And who, or what, is DRASTIC?

Locked down in Toronto with the world at a standstill, Dewar pored over newspapers and magazines, preprints and peer-reviewed journals, email chains and blacked-out responses to access to information requests; she conducted Zoom interviews and called telephone numbers until someone answered as she hunted down the truth of the virus’s origin. In this compelling whodunnit, she reads the science, follows the money, connects the geopolitical interests to the spin—and shows how leading science journals got it wrong, leaving it to interested citizens and junior scientists to pull out the truth.

ABOUT ELAINE DEWAR

Elaine Dewar—author, journalist, television story editor—has been honoured by nine National Magazine awards, including the prestigious President’s Medal, and the White Award. Her first book, Cloak of Green, delved into the dark side of environmental politics and became an underground classic. Bones: Discovering the First Americans, an investigation of the science and politics regarding the peopling of the Americas, was a national bestseller and earned a special commendation from the Canadian Archaeological Association. The Second Tree: of Clones, Chimeras, and Quests for Immortality, won Canada’s premier literary non-fiction prize from the Writers’ Trust. Called “Canada’s Rachel Carson,” Dewar aspires to be a happy warrior for the public good.

 

Get your copy of On the Origin from Biblioasis here!

Nov
14
Sun
Chemical Valley signing at Westminster Books @ Westminster Books
Nov 14 @ 3:00 pm – 4:30 pm

David Huebert will be at Westminster Books in Fredericton to sign copies of his new short story collection, Chemical Valley (October 12, 2021)! The event will take place on Sunday, November 14 at 3PM. Masks are mandatory.

 

ABOUT CHEMICAL VALLEY

Oil-soaked and swamp-born, the bruised optimism of Huebert’s stories offer sincere appreciation of the beauty of our wilted, wheezing world.
From city-dwelling preppers to long term care nurses, dishwashers to professional hockey enforcers to refinery workers, Chemical Valley’s caring and carefully-wrought stories cultivate rich human emotional worlds in all the dankness of our bio-chemical animacy. Full-hearted, laced throughout with bruised optimism and a sincere appreciation of the profound beauty of our wilted, wheezing world, Chemical Valley does not shy away from urgent modern questions—the distribution of toxicity, environmental racism, the future of technology, the climate, and the human body—but it grounds these anxieties in vivid and often humorous intricacies of its characters’ lives. These are stories about big questions, but they are not scared of sentiment. Swamp-wrought, they run wild with vital energy, tilt and teeter into crazed and delirious loves.

ABOUT DAVID HUEBERT

David Huebert’s writing has won the CBC Short Story Prize, The Walrus Poetry Prize, and was a finalist for the 2020 Journey Prize. David’s fiction debut, Peninsula Sinking, won a Dartmouth Book Award, was shortlisted for the Alistair MacLeod Short Fiction Prize, and was runner-up for the Danuta Gleed Literary Award. David’s work has been published in magazines such as The Walrus, Maisonneuve, enRoute, and Canadian Notes & Queries, and anthologized in Best Canadian Stories and The Journey Prize Stories. David teaches at The University of King’s College in K’jipuktuk/Halifax, where he lives and writes.

 

Order your copy of Chemical Valley here!

Nov
17
Wed
Romantic Virtual Launch
Nov 17 @ 7:00 pm – 8:00 pm
Romantic Virtual Launch

You’re invited to the virtual launch of Mark Callanan’s Romantic! Join us on Wednesday, November 17 at 7 PM ET/8:30 PM NT. Mark Callanan will be joined in conversation by fellow poet, Luke Hathaway. We’ll be streaming live on Facebook & on YouTube. Video link will be shared closer to the event, so RSVP to stay up to date!

ABOUT ROMANTIC

Drawing on Arthurian myth, the Romantic poets, the ill-fated “Great War” efforts of the Newfoundland Regiment, modern parenthood, 16-bit video games, and Major League Baseball, these poems examine the stories we tell ourselves about ourselves, both as individuals and as communities, in order to explain how and why we are the way we are. At its heart, Romantic interrogates our western society’s idealized, self-deluding personal and cultural perspectives.

ABOUT MARK CALLANAN

Mark Callanan is the author of two previous poetry collections. He was one of the founding editors of the St. John’s, Newfoundland-based literary journal Riddle Fence and co-edited The Breakwater Book of Contemporary Newfoundland Poetry. He lives in St. John’s with his wife, poet and critic Andreae Callanan, and their four children.

ABOUT LUKE HATHAWAY

Luke Hathaway (he/him) is a poet, editor, essayist, librettist, and play-maker, who teaches creative writing and English literature at Saint Mary’s University in Halifax; until September of 2020 he was Amanda Jernigan (she/her), and as Amanda published three books of poems—Groundwork, All the Daylight Hours, and Years, Months, and Days, the last of these named a best book of the year in the New York Times. His latest book (published under the name A.H. Jernigan) is the long poem New Year Letter (Baseline Press, 2020).

 

Get your copy of Romantic from Biblioasis here!

Nov
29
Mon
Andrew Potter at TPL: On Decline
Nov 29 @ 7:00 pm – 8:00 pm
Andrew Potter at TPL: On Decline

Join us virtually as Andrew Potter shares his new book On Decline (August 17, 2021) with host Karim Bardeesy and discusses the devastating effects of cultural nostalgia and the havoc wreaked by social media on public discourse. The event is part of the Toronto Public Library’s On Civil Society series. The event will take place on Monday, November 29 at 7PM EDT.

Register to watch here!

 

ABOUT ON DECLINE

What if David Bowie really was holding the fabric of the universe together?

The death of David Bowie in January 2016 was a bad start to a year that got a lot worse: war in Syria, the Zika virus, terrorist attacks in Brussels and Nice, the Brexit vote—and the election of Donald Trump. The end-of-year wraps declared 2016 “the worst … ever.” Four even more troubling years later, the question of our apocalypse had devolved into a tired social media cliché. But when COVID-19 hit, journalist and professor of public policy Andrew Potter started to wonder: what if The End isn’t one big event, but a long series of smaller ones?

In On Decline, Potter surveys the current problems and likely future of Western civilization (spoiler: it’s not great). Economic stagnation and the slowing of scientific innovation. Falling birth rates and environmental degradation. The devastating effects of cultural nostalgia and the havoc wreaked by social media on public discourse. Most acutely, the various failures of Western governments in their responses to the COVID-19 pandemic. If the legacy of the Enlightenment and its virtues—reason, logic, science, evidence—has run its course, how and why has it happened? And where do we go from here?

ABOUT ANDREW POTTER

Andrew Potter is an associate professor (professional) at the Max Bell School of Public Policy. A former journalist, between 2011 and 2016 Andrew Potter was managing editor and then editor in chief of the Ottawa Citizen, and from 2006 to 2011 he was a public affairs columnist for Maclean’s Magazine. He is also a former Director of the McGill Institute for the Study of Canada. Potter is the author of The Authenticity Hoax: How We Get Lost Finding Ourselves, and the co-author, with Joseph Heath, of the best-selling book The Rebel Sell: Why the Culture Can’t be Jammed.

 

Order your copy from Biblioasis here!