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AS YOU WERE Virtual Launch Video

On Saturday, October 16, we held the virtual launch of Elaine Feeney’s As You Were! Elaine had an excellent discussion with Douglas Stuart, Booker-Prize winning author of Shuggie Bain, and the event was hosted by Grace Harper. Afterward, there was an audience Q&A, and a book giveaway!

And if you weren’t able to watch the event live, no worries! You can still watch it here:

ABOUT AS YOU WERE

Sinéad Hynes is a tough, driven, funny young property developer with a terminal cancer diagnosis—but no one knows it: not her fellow patients in a failing hospital, and certainly not her family. She has confided only in Google and a shiny magpie. Yet she can’t go on like this, tirelessly trying to outstrip her past and in mortal fear of her future. Across the ward, Margaret Rose is running her chaotic family from her rose-gold Nokia. In the neighbouring bed, Jane, rarely but piercingly lucid, is searching for a decent bra and for someone to listen. And Sinéad needs them both.

As You Were is about intimate histories, institutional failures, the kindness of strangers, and the darkly present past of modern Ireland; about women’s stories and women’s struggles; about seizing the moment to be free. Wildly funny, desperately tragic, inventive and irrepressible, As You Were introduces a brilliant new voice.

ABOUT ELAINE FEENEY

Elaine Feeney is an award-winning writer from Galway and teaches at The National University of Ireland, Galway. She has published three collections of poetry, including The Radio was Gospel and Rise and the award-winning drama, WRoNGHEADED with The Liz Roche Company. As You Were, her debut novel, was published in 2020 by Vintage in the UK and in 2021 by Biblioasis in North America. It was shortlisted for Novel of the Year at the Irish Book Awards and was included in The Guardian’s top debut novels for 2020. It appeared widely in best books of 2020 including in The Telegraph, The Irish Independent, The Evening Standard, The Guardian, The Observer and The Irish Times.

Order from Biblioasis here!

CHEMICAL VALLEY and HOUSEHOLDERS: Double Launch Video

Last night we celebrated the double launch of two exciting Biblioasis books: Kate Cayley’s Householders and David Huebert’s Chemical Valley! Kate Cayley and David Huebert were joined in conversation by author Sofi Papamarko. After each author read from their work, the discussions kicked off in a fascinating range of topics, from communes to petroleum, artificiality to the placement of COVID in short stories. The conversations led into an audience Q&A, and we wrapped up the night with a giveaway of each book!

And in case you missed the live event, don’t worry! You can still watch it here:

 

Get your copy of Householders from Biblioasis here!

Get your copy of Chemical Valley from Biblioasis here!

 

ABOUT HOUSEHOLDERS

A woman impersonates a nun online, with unexpected consequences. In a rapidly changing neighborhood, tensions escalate around two events planned for the same day. The barista girlfriend of a tech billionaire survives a zombie apocalypse only to face spending her life with the paranoid super-rich. From a university campus to an underground bunker, a commune in the woods to Toronto and back again, the linked stories in Householders move effortlessly between the commonplace and the fantastic. In deft and exacting narratives about difficult children and thorny friendships, hopeful revolutionaries and self-deluded utopians, nascent queers, sincere frauds, and families of all kinds, Kate Cayley mines the moral hazards inherent in the ways we try to save each other and ourselves.

Kate Cayley has previously written a short story collection, two poetry collections, and a number of plays, both traditional and experimental, which have been produced in Canada and the US. She is a frequent writing collaborator with immersive company Zuppa Theatre. She has won the Trillium Book Award and an O. Henry Prize and been a finalist for the Governor General’s Award. She lives in Toronto with her wife and their three children.

 

ABOUT CHEMICAL VALLEY

Out there by the dock the ocean and the air are just layers of shadow and darkness. But the creature’s flesh hums through the dark—a seep of violet in the weeping night.

From refinery operators to long term care nurses, dishwashers to preppers to hockey enforcers, Chemical Valley’s compassionate and carefully wrought stories cultivate rich emotional worlds in and through the dankness of our bio-chemical animacy. Full-hearted, laced throughout with bruised optimism and sincere appreciation of the profound beauty of our wilted, wheezing world, Chemical Valley doesn’t shy away from urgent modern questions—the distribution of toxicity, environmental racism, the place of technoculture in this ecological spasm—but grounds these anxieties in the vivid and often humorous intricacies of its characters’ lives. Swamp-wrought and heartfelt, these stories run wild with vital energy, tilt and teeter into crazed and delirious loves.

David Huebert’s writing has won the CBC Short Story Prize, The Walrus Poetry Prize, and was a finalist for the 2020 Journey Prize. David’s fiction debut, Peninsula Sinking, won a Dartmouth Book Award, was shortlisted for the Alistair MacLeod Short Fiction Prize, and was runner-up for the Danuta Gleed Literary Award. David’s work has been published in magazines such as The Walrus, Maisonneuve, enRoute, and Canadian Notes & Queries, and anthologized in Best Canadian Stories and The Journey Prize Stories. David teaches at The University of King’s College in K’jipuktuk/Halifax, where he lives and writes.

THINGS ARE AGAINST US Launch Video

We had a wonderful time celebrating the virtual book launch of Lucy Ellmann’s essay collection this past Sunday, September 26. Lucy Ellmann had an engaging conversation with Todd McEwen and Diana Hope, and the event was hosted by Josh Cook. After the reading and discussions, there was an audience Q&A, and a successful book giveaway.

And if you couldn’t make the live event, don’t worry! You can still watch it below.

Get your copy of Things Are Against Us here!

On the Origin Launch Video

Last night we celebrated the virtual launch of Elaine Dewar’s On the Origin of the Deadliest Pandemic in 100 Years! Elaine Dewar had a fascinating discussion with Wayne Grady, Canadian writer, editor, and translator. Afterward, there was an audience Q&A and giveaway of a copy of On the Origin of the Deadliest Pandemic in 100 Years!

And if you weren’t able to join last night, don’t worry! You can still watch the event here:

ABOUT ON THE ORIGIN OF THE DEADLIEST PANDEMIC IN 100 YEARS

In this compelling whodunnit, Elaine Dewar reads the science, follows the money, and connects the geopolitical interests to the spin.

When the first TV newscast described a SARS-like flu affecting a distant Chinese metropolis, investigative journalist Elaine Dewar started asking questions: Was SARS-CoV-2 something that came from nature, as leading scientists insisted, or did it come from a lab, and what role might controversial experiments have played in its development? Why was Wuhan the pandemic’s ground zero—and why, on the other side of the Atlantic, had two researchers been marched out of a lab in Winnipeg by the RCMP? Why were governments so slow to respond to the emerging pandemic, and why, now, is the government of China refusing to cooperate with the World Health Organization? And who, or what, is DRASTIC?

Locked down in Toronto with the world at a standstill, Dewar pored over newspapers and magazines, preprints and peer-reviewed journals, email chains and blacked-out responses to access to information requests; she conducted Zoom interviews and called telephone numbers until someone answered as she hunted down the truth of the virus’s origin. In this compelling whodunnit, she reads the science, follows the money, connects the geopolitical interests to the spin—and shows how leading science journals got it wrong, leaving it to interested citizens and junior scientists to pull out the truth.

ABOUT ELAINE DEWAR

Elaine Dewar—author, journalist, television story editor—has been honoured by nine National Magazine awards, including the prestigious President’s Medal, and the White Award. Her first book, Cloak of Green, delved into the dark side of environmental politics and became an underground classic. Bones: Discovering the First Americans, an investigation of the science and politics regarding the peopling of the Americas, was a national bestseller and earned a special commendation from the Canadian Archaeological Association. The Second Tree: of Clones, Chimeras, and Quests for Immortality, won Canada’s premier literary non-fiction prize from the Writers’ Trust. Called “Canada’s Rachel Carson,” Dewar aspires to be a happy warrior for the public good.

 

Order your copy from Biblioasis here!

STRANGERS Virtual Launch Video

On Thursday, May 27 we celebrated the launch of Rob Taylor’s poetry collection, Strangers! Rob Taylor was joined for a great discussion by Sadiqa de Meijer and Sue Sinclair. The night finished off with an audience Q&A and book giveaway! The event was co-hosted with Massy Books in Vancouver, BC.

And ICYMI, you can still watch the launch in the video below!

ABOUT STRANGERS

“It makes no sense. You would be strangers / if not for this.”

In Strangers, Rob Taylor makes new the epiphany poem: the short lyric ending with a moment of recognition or arrival. In his hands, the form becomes not simply a revelation in words but, in Wallace Stevens’ phrase, “a revelation in words by means of the words.” The epiphany here is not only the poet’s. It’s ours. A book about the songlines of memory and language and the ways in which they connect us to other human beings, to read Strangers is to become part of the lineages (literary, artistic, familial) that it braids together—to become, as Richard Outram puts it, an “unspoken / Stranger no longer.”

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Rob Taylor is the author of four poetry collections, including Strangers (Biblioasis, 2021) and The News (Gaspereau Press, 2016), which was a finalist for the 2017 Dorothy Livesay Poetry Prize. He is also the editor of What the Poets Are Doing: Canadian Poets in Conversation (Nightwood Editions, 2018) and the guest editor of Best Canadian Poetry 2019 (Biblioasis, 2019). Rob lives with his family in Port Moody, BC.

Order your copy from Biblioasis here!

You can also order from Massy Books, or your local bookstore!

VILLA NEGATIVA and SMITHEREENS Virtual Double Launch Video

We had a wonderful time last night celebrating the double poetry launch of Sharon McCartney’s Villa Negativa, as well as Terence Young’s Smithereens from Harbour Publishing! The two authors each read from their books, and had a lively discussion, before finishing the event with an audience Q&A and giveaway.

And if you missed it, don’t worry! You can still watch the video here:

Order your copy of Villa Negativa by Sharon McCartney here.

Visit Harbour Publishing’s site to learn more about Smithereens by Terence Young here.

ABOUT VILLA NEGATIVA

The anticipated seventh collection of poetry from the celebrated Canadian poet.
How can we know who we are when we can never step away from ourselves? Villa Negativa posits that we can only know what we are not and explores that conundrum against the backdrop of a sibling’s illness and death, an eating disorder and a couple of really dismal dating relationships. Though it could be sombre territory, Villa Negativa looks for the laughter behind the darkness: the housebreaker who takes off her shoes first, the fabricator whose most intimate relationship is with fibreglass, the anorexic who sends the Diet Coke back because it tastes too good.

ABOUT SMITHEREENS

In Smithereens, Terence Young ranges widely among forms, subjects, tones and moods, invoking the domestic world of family and home, as well as the associated realms of work and play. He describes the simple pleasure of losing one’s bearings and seeing the world anew in “Tender is the Night,” and in “The Bear” he records the near-magical appearance at a summer cabin of a creature that hasn’t been seen in the area in over fifty years. The ironic benefits of a house fire, the late-night sounds of a downtown alley, the smells of a summer morning in the Gulf islands—all of these serve as vehicles for reminiscence, meditation and humour. Elsewhere in the collection, he summons an elegiac mood, remembering in poems like “Surcease,” “Fern Island Candle,” “The Morning Mike Dies,” and “Gary” some of the friends who have left his world. More than any of his previous books, though, Smithereens features poems that are playful, in which language is often associative, surprising and fun. It is a collection that will reward readers, whatever their temperament upon picking it up, and it will also invite them to return to its pages again and again.